(Published on FashionUnited)

In June I hosted a webinar to offer attendees a glimpse at what the fall-winter 2022 season will have to offer.

Hugh Hughes from FashionUnited attended the talk and wrote an article which shares a summary of some of the key takeaways.
Hereby a quick overview.

Surviving the Anthropocene

This trend is all about protection, utility, and survivalism and features a lot of natural patterns, utilitarian designs, padded or soft and fluffy fabrics, indigenous symbolism and reused materials and fabrics.

The colour mood is based on nature and outdoors combined with vintage, secondhand and “waste tones” – ecru grey, as well as light blues and greens, are important.

 

An increasingly phigital world

The second trend is all about the way our digital and physical worlds are progressively melting into one another, creating a reality where it’s often hard to distinguish where one finishes and the other begins.

The trend is characterised by high tech and sheer materials, and the colour palette is a mix of cold, futuristic and rendered “screen colours” but with a new twist: “We saw with spring-summer 22 that all these screen colours are very important,” Boland said. “But now we see screen colours that have the impression they are vintage and retro – that’s the next level.”

 

Unleashing female force

The third trend is influenced by the continued blurring of genders in fashion and the redefinition of what is typically male or female as these stereotypes are challenged.

Fabrics are refined and ornamental but also a bit strange, with lace playing a key role. Boland also referred to the Victorian era – which is of “great importance” to the trend – a time where we saw one of the early uprisings of women.

 

Seeking sanctuary

The fourth trend taps into our desire to seek sanctuary in such an uncertain time frame where growing political and social polariation and the pandemic have made us yearn for healing and self-meditation.

It results in designs and patterns that are soothing, soulful and healing – ones that almost act as “visual yoga”. The mood of the trend is balanced, introverted and silent, and the fabrics have a very high tactility. Shapes are dramatic and oversized but with soft rounded corners, so no hard edges. Or “blanket-inspired designs”, as Boland puts it.

Read the full article here